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Posts Tagged ‘Aaron Dessner’

Aaron Dessner said the band has received  “hate mail on Facebook” for supporting Obama. Regardless, The National’s support for Obama has not wavered.

Matt Berninger said:

“This is more important than a rock band. I know we’ve gotten responses from people (who) don’t like the fact that we’ve taken a position on it, and I don’t actually think artists or musicians necessarily have a responsibility to do that. But in our case, the five of us … talked about it and we were like, ‘Yeah, it’s worth it, for sure.’”

read the entire Berninger interview at The Lantern

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Q: Doing a political event like this, has there been any worry amongst the band that you might be alienating a segment of your fans by putting yourselves out there for a specific candidate?

No. I think to us it’s a very clear choice between President Obama and Mitt Romney. There’s really no equivocation for us towards considerations like that, as far as alienating fans who might be Republicans or not agree with our politics. We’re not interested in telling anyone what to think and we’re not a heavy-handed political band as far as our songwriting. It’s in there, but often it’s a backdrop to other issues.

But we all feel that 2008 was a  historic, positive change for the country. There’s been some political gridlock and issues that come with the recession lasting, but we really feel there’s been a lot of positive movement and change that we can be really proud of. We’re very proud to be American and to have a president like President Obama. For us it’s really a no-brainer as far as supporting campaign and we’re terrified of going backwards towards the policies of the Bush era.

(The Bush Era) had a lot to do with the formation of “Alligator” and “Boxer” and even “Sad Songs for Dirty Lovers.” All those albums were written in the Bush Era and I think our fans are quite aware of that. Most people who are fans of The National would be more Democratic, hopefully.

 

read the entire interview HERE

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Matt Berninger and Aaron and Bryce Dessner have contributed to a new children’s iPad story app called Dragon Brush.

The story, which is based on a traditional Chinese folktale, was narrated by Matt. The music was done by Aaron & Bryce. The illustrations were done by John Solimine of Spike Press, who has done the artwork for many of The National’s posters.

Matt Berninger said in a press release: “The story has all my favorite things: waterfalls, magical dragons, and the sound of my own voice.”

preview it below

 

 

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St Vincent goes into the crowd and goes wild. well worth watching.

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via Jambands.com

“The National’s Bryan Devendorf and Scott Devendorf will perform with Bob Weir at his San Rafael, CA TRI studios on Saturday, March 24. Organized by HeadCount, the collaborative The Bridge Session will feature a mix of Grateful Dead classics, National songs and other politically-themed covers as well as a round table discussion moderated by Disco Biscuits bassist Marc Brownstein.”

“The entire evening will be broadcast via TRI’s website. For those unable to make it to the performance, Brooklyn, NY’s Littlefield will host an official viewing party on The National’s home turf. Admission is $5 and will include a stream of the entire concert. The show is slated to start at 9 PM. All proceeds will benefit HeadCount.”

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There is no question the Dessner brothers have a musical reach well beyond the saturated rock songs of their day job.

Read the entire review HERE

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I was watching a video interview with him about The Long Count which was interesting – he said that for him, it also extended to ideas of games and combat, conflict and play in every day life. Was that of significance to you too?

AD: Yeah, definitely. I remember… early on, it was very much about games and play and tests, and we tried to affect that in the music. A lot of the music involves these chases, or mirroring – my brother and I can play guitar in really unique ways together because of how we grew up. Literally I can look at his hand and play the exact same thing or the exact opposite thing, or a key off. What usually happens is that I’m playing something and he plays a mirror or echo of it, and a lot of music is like that, and it’s extended into the ensemble also, so it’s like twins also. That extends into the film as well – you see the film, the two diamond shape films, and then they reflect down off of this mirror floor, so everything is doubled or quadrupled, so this has this interesting effect where it’s all very playful.

You must both be acutely aware of the ways in which you and Bryce work together and apart.

AD: I think we have this instinctive feeling that if we hit a wall at some point, that the other will be able to break through it. We have different tendencies: he’s much more academic about music than I am, and I’m more visceral or spontaneous. It’s probably easier for me to generate lots of new ideas, a constant stream, and in a way it’s easier for him to finish those ideas, and maybe elevate them beyond a simple idea. But then he’ll do some work and I’ll take it further. There are very few times where either of us is working on something where the either isn’t in some way part of it. Bryce is writing more orchestral work now, and some of that I’m not involved in it, some of that I am, and in some ways that’s a different exercise when you’re writing in a more traditional way, as opposed to collaborating. We’re always finishing each other’s ideas, and it works really well in The National, and in some ways it works even better in these more expansive, experimental ways. There aren’t these restraints. With The Long Count, there are a lot more musicians to bounce things out of and draw on, different voices and things. It’s liberating.

read the rest HERE

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